AWS Secrets Manager Credentials Provider

ID: aws-secrets-manager-credentials-provider

Build Status Jenkins Plugin

Access credentials from AWS Secrets Manager in your Jenkins jobs.

Contents

Features

  • Read-only view of Secrets Manager.
  • CredentialsProvider and SecretSource API support.
  • Credential metadata caching (duration: 5 minutes).

Setup

IAM

Give Jenkins read access to Secrets Manager with an IAM policy.

Required permissions:

  • secretsmanager:GetSecretValue
  • secretsmanager:ListSecrets

Optional permissions:

  • kms:Decrypt (if you use a customer-managed KMS key to encrypt the secret)

Example:

{
    "Version": "2012-10-17",
    "Statement": [
        {
            "Sid": "AllowJenkinsToGetSecretValues",
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": "secretsmanager:GetSecretValue",
            "Resource": "*"
        },
        {
            "Sid": "AllowJenkinsToListSecrets",
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": "secretsmanager:ListSecrets"
        }
    ]
}

Jenkins

The plugin uses the AWS Java SDK to communicate with Secrets Manager. If you are running Jenkins outside EC2 or EKS you may need to manually configure the SDK to authenticate with AWS. See the authentication guide for more information.

Then, install and configure the plugin.

Usage

The plugin supports the following secrets resolution APIs:

Note: Any string secret is accessible through SecretSource, but only a secret with the jenkins:credentials:type tag is accessible through CredentialsProvider. This distinction allows you to share tagged secrets between both APIs, while untagged secrets are only accessible through SecretSource.

CredentialsProvider

The plugin allows secrets from Secrets Manager to be used as Jenkins credentials.

Jenkins must know which credential type a secret is meant to be (e.g. Secret Text, Username With Password), in order to present it as a credential. To do this, you MUST add the relevant AWS tags to the secrets in Secrets Manager, as shown in the sections below. (If the credentials cache is enabled you must also wait for that to refresh before the newly annotated secrets appear in Jenkins.) Without these tags, the corresponding credentials will not appear in Jenkins.

Secret Text

A simple text secret.

  • Value: secret
  • Tags:
    • jenkins:credentials:type = string
Example

AWS CLI:

aws secretsmanager create-secret --name 'newrelic-api-key' --secret-string 'abc123' --tags 'Key=jenkins:credentials:type,Value=string' --description 'Acme Corp Newrelic API key'

Declarative Pipeline:

pipeline {
    agent any
    environment {
        NEWRELIC_API_KEY = credentials('newrelic-api-key')
    }
    stages {
        stage('Foo') {
            steps {
              echo 'Hello world'
            }
        }
    }
}

Scripted Pipeline:

node {
    withCredentials([string(credentialsId: 'newrelic-api-key', variable: 'NEWRELIC_API_KEY')]) {
        echo 'Hello world'
    }
}

Username with Password

A username and password pair.

  • Value: password
  • Tags:
    • jenkins:credentials:type = usernamePassword
    • jenkins:credentials:username = username
Example

AWS CLI:

aws secretsmanager create-secret --name 'artifactory' --secret-string 'supersecret' --tags 'Key=jenkins:credentials:type,Value=usernamePassword' 'Key=jenkins:credentials:username,Value=joe' --description 'Acme Corp Artifactory login'

Declarative Pipeline:

pipeline {
    agent any
    environment {
        // Creates variables ARTIFACTORY=joe:supersecret, ARTIFACTORY_USR=joe, ARTIFACTORY_PSW=supersecret
        ARTIFACTORY = credentials('artifactory')
    }
    stages {
        stage('Foo') {
            steps {
              echo 'Hello world'
            }
        }
    }
}

Scripted Pipeline:

node {
    withCredentials([usernamePassword(credentialsId: 'artifactory', usernameVariable: 'ARTIFACTORY_USR', passwordVariable: 'ARTIFACTORY_PSW')]) {
        echo 'Hello world'
    }
}

SSH User Private Key

An SSH private key, with a username.

  • Value: private key
  • Tags:
    • jenkins:credentials:type = sshUserPrivateKey
    • jenkins:credentials:username = username

Common private key formats include PKCS#1 (starts with -----BEGIN [ALGORITHM] PRIVATE KEY-----) and PKCS#8 (starts with -----BEGIN PRIVATE KEY-----).

Example

AWS CLI:

ssh-keygen -t rsa -b 4096 -C 'acme@example.com' -f id_rsa
aws secretsmanager create-secret --name 'ssh-key' --secret-string 'file://id_rsa' --tags 'Key=jenkins:credentials:type,Value=sshUserPrivateKey' 'Key=jenkins:credentials:username,Value=joe' --description 'Acme Corp SSH key'

Declarative Pipeline:

pipeline {
    agent any
    environment {
        // Creates variables KEY=/temp/path/to/key, KEY_USR=joe
        KEY = credentials('ssh-key')
    }
    stages {
        stage('Foo') {
            steps {
              echo 'Hello world'
            }
        }
    }
}

Scripted Pipeline:

node {
    withCredentials([sshUserPrivateKey(credentialsId: 'ssh-key', keyFileVariable: 'KEY', usernameVariable: 'KEY_USR')]) {
        echo 'Hello world'
    }
}

Certificate

A client certificate keystore in PKCS#12 format, encrypted with a zero-length password.

  • Value: keystore
  • Tags:
    • jenkins:credentials:type = certificate
Example

AWS CLI:

openssl pkcs12 -export -in /path/to/cert.pem -inkey /path/to/key.pem -out certificate.p12 -passout pass:
aws secretsmanager create-secret --name 'code-signing-cert' --secret-binary 'fileb://certificate.p12' --tags 'Key=jenkins:credentials:type,Value=certificate' --description 'Acme Corp code signing certificate'

Scripted Pipeline:

node {
    withCredentials([certificate(credentialsId: 'code-signing-cert', keystoreVariable: 'STORE_FILE')]) {
        echo 'Hello world'
    }
}

Secret File

A secret file with binary content and an optional filename.

  • Value: content
  • Tags:
    • jenkins:credentials:type = file
    • jenkins:credentials:filename = filename (optional)

The credential ID is used as the filename by default. In the rare cases when you need to override this (for example, if the credential ID would be an invalid filename on your filesystem), you can set the jenkins:credentials:filename tag.

Example

AWS CLI:

echo -n $'\x01\x02\x03' > license.bin
aws secretsmanager create-secret --name 'license-key' --secret-binary 'fileb://license.bin' --tags 'Key=jenkins:credentials:type,Value=file' --description 'License key'

Declarative Pipeline:

pipeline {
    agent any
    environment {
        LICENSE_KEY_FILE = credentials('license-key')
    }
    stages {
        stage('Example') {
            steps {
              echo 'Hello world'
            }
        }
    }
}

Scripted Pipeline:

node {
    withCredentials([file(credentialsId: 'license-key', variable: 'LICENSE_KEY_FILE')]) {
        echo 'Hello world'
    }
}

SecretSource

The plugin allows JCasC to interpolate string secrets from Secrets Manager.

Example

AWS CLI:

aws secretsmanager create-secret --name 'my-password' --secret-string 'abc123' --description 'Jenkins user password'

JCasC:

jenkins:
  securityRealm:
    local:
      allowsSignup: false
      users:
      - id: "foo"
        password: "${my-password}"

Advanced Usage

You may need to deal with multi-field credentials or vendor-specific credential types that the plugin does not (yet) support.

In this situation you have a couple of choices:

  • Use the closest standard multi-field credential (e.g. Username With Password) that fits your requirements.
  • Use a string credential, serialize all the fields into the secret value (e.g. as JSON or as a delimited string), and parse them in the job script. (This is a last resort when other methods don't work, e.g. when secret rotation would cause multiple fields to change.)

Example: Jenkins authenticates to Secrets Manager using the primary AWS credential (from the environment). You have a job that performs a particular AWS operation in a different account, which uses a secondary AWS credential. You choose to encode the secondary AWS credential as JSON in the string credential foo:

node {
    withCredentials([string(credentialsId: 'foo', variable: 'secret')]) {
        script {
            def creds = readJSON text: secret
            env.AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID = creds['accessKeyId']
            env.AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY = creds['secretAccessKey']
            env.AWS_DEFAULT_REGION = 'us-east-1' // or whatever
        }
        sh "aws sts get-caller-identity" // or whatever
    }
}

Configuration

The plugin has a couple of optional settings to fine-tune its behavior. In most installations you do not need to change these settings. If you need to change the configuration, you can use the Web UI or CasC.

Web UI

You can set plugin configuration using the Web UI.

Go to Manage Jenkins > Configure System > AWS Secrets Manager Credentials Provider and change the settings.

Available settings:

  • Cache (on/off)
  • Endpoint Configuration
    • Service Endpoint
    • Signing Region
  • ListSecrets configuration
    • Filters

Configuration As Code (CasC)

You can set plugin configuration using Jenkins Configuration As Code.

unclassified:
  awsCredentialsProvider:
    cache: true  # cache is on by default
    endpointConfiguration:
      serviceEndpoint: http://localhost:4584
      signingRegion: us-east-1
    listSecrets:
      filters:
        - key: name
          values:
            - foo
            - bar
        - key: tag-key
          values:
            - Environment
        - key: tag-value
          values:
            - staging
            - production
        - key: description
          values:
            - "my API key"  # note: filtering by tags or name is usually a better approach

Development

Dependencies

  • Docker
  • Java
  • Maven

Build

In Maven:

mvn clean verify

In your IDE:

  1. Generate translations: mvn localizer:generate. (This is a one-off task. You only need to re-run this if you change the translations, or if you clean the Maven target directory.)
  2. Compile.
  3. Start Moto: mvn docker:build docker:start.
  4. Run tests.
  5. Stop Moto: mvn docker:stop.
ArchivesGet past versions
Version: 0.5.3
Released:
Requires Jenkins 2.222.4
Installs: 1,700
Labels
Maintainers
Chris Kilding
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